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Wine Appreciation and Alcohol Abuse: How to Avoid Personal Disaster

(images: brainboomer.com, jamieq.blogspot.com)

I work in two professions - Wine Consulting and Playing Rock Music - that pretty much guarantee that I am in close proximity to alcohol (and its potential abuse) a good portion of the time.

I love to drink. Specifically, I love to savor excellent wine (and beer), and admire the nuances, flavors, aromas, and overall artistic craftsmanship that a good drink can deliver. Most of all, I love sharing that experience with others. Wine connects us to a particular place and time, and connects us with each other - not just the place, time, and people that made it, but also the place, time and people with whom we enjoy it when we pop the cork.

And once in a blue moon, I like to overdo it a bit. Because getting buzzed with friends is, well, it's just plain fun.

Notice I wrote "once in a blue moon" and not "every weekend." In the rock-&-roll context of my life, I've seen first-hand what alcohol abuse can do to individuals, families, and even total strangers that come into unfortunate (and sometimes, in the case of drunk driving, catastrophic and tragic) contact with an abuser.

Genetics and personality traits are very important in determining anyone's individual predilection towards abuse of alcohol, but it doesn't help that cultural, and peer pressures (at least in the U.S. and the U.K.) tend to ridicule the appreciation of wine as snobbish, while at the same time aggrandizing inebriation as the height of fun in a social context.

That approach is completely ass-backward. I don't have any pithy humorous sayings on that topic. It's just so sad, stupid, and heartbreaking that I can't make it funny and still respect myself.

Alcohol-related liver diseases (which are notoriously difficult to diagnose until they are advanced) have been on the rise in countries like Britain for years. Whether you drink or not, the rising abuse of alcohol (in the U.S. or the U.K. for example) is expensive for taxpayers and health insurance recipients who all help to fund health care systems that are having trouble keeping up without breaking their banks.

I'm not the first person to touch on how these dangers impact those of us in the wine consulting biz (check out this great series in Men's Vogue for an example). But I thought I'd add to the on-line discussion by listing the tips that have helped me (so far) to successfully navigate the waters of wine appreciation while minimizing the damage to my liver (and my relationships)...


Abuse Is NOT 'One-Size-Fits-All.' Safe levels of drinking can only ever be approximate. While you may read that having 2 drinks per day is the safe average level of consumption for someone of your weight and gender, these generalized figures don't take into account your race, family history, or personality type. You can't treat these as hard-and-fast rules - your safe levels may differ.


All Things In Moderation. If 2 drinks per day is a safe limit for you, that doesn't mean that abstaining from drinking for one week means that you can safely consume 14 drinks over the weekend. If you are unsure if your current alcohol consumption levels are safe, consult alcoholism.about.com (or, better yet, talk to your doctor).


Treat Professional Settings Professionally. I've written before about the perils of industry tastings, so I won't repeat all of that advice here. Bear in mind that just because free alcohol is available to you doesn't mean that you are obligated to drink it. When you're at industry tastings, don't forget to spit, and don't use it as an excuse to catch up on drinking that you think you've "missed out on" in the past.


Don't Punish Yourself. If you're not an abuser, drinking too much once in a long while shouldn't upset you (unless it's caused you to do something that you regret). Nobody's perfect. Just make a mental note to improve the next time. If needed, ask your friends for support. (If you are an abuser, or concerned that you might be headed in that direction, then falling off the wagon is a big deal and might need the help of a professional).


Never, Ever, Under Any Circumstances Drink & Drive. This one should be obvious but amazingly I still know people who do this. This is never, ever safe under any circumstances. If you suspect that you're going to have more than your normally safe level of alcohol, get someone else to drive - no excuses.


Cheers!

2 comments:

Christine Marucci said...

These are interesting pieces of advice- but I wonder, is it something that needs to be adhered to as you get older or what?

The reason I ask is - I drink heavily and wondered if I was an alcoholic - but I'm relatively young (23) to become such, I think. It runs in the family, and it came to the point where I couldn’t even remember the last day where I didn’t have a drink. Lastly, I hate to admit, but I think I've broken almost every one of your rules.

I recently decided to test myself to go 30 days without alcohol and am documenting the experience in a 30 Days Without Alcohol blog where I examine the key differences in my social situations now that I’ve not had a drink in 2 days (and counting)

Please share this with interested readers.
30dayswithoutalcohol.blogspot.com

Joe Roberts, CSW said...

Thanks, Christine. I really like the idea of your blog and I think it's courageous of you to do it.

I'm pretty sure that these tips could be helpful for any age of person that is worried about their alcohol consumption levels.

I don't know if these tips are the most helpful for your situation - I'm not a counselor with any formal training - but I can say that if you're worried about your intake of drinks, and you think you should cut back, then you should follow your heart and do it, no matter what others tell you.